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+ oglaighnaheireann:

Bobby Sands Election Results

oglaighnaheireann:

Bobby Sands Election Results

Posted 4 hours ago.

you’ve all been given a specific role and code name.

+ iambluedog:
Life is too short to be holding on to old grudges

iambluedog:

Life is too short to be holding on to old grudges

Posted 8 hours ago.

the11supernovas:

oh you’re watching pacific rim? i love that movie, the way they just [clenches fist] rim all of the pacific

Posted 9 hours ago.

jastascatterbrain:

elysedc:

The ultimate dad joke compilation

My dad, a construction worker who resembles a lumberjack, is a terrible texter and basically just recieves pictures from friends and family but nevet replies or anything.
One day, when he was getting interviewed at a big power plant to do a long-term job, he spent a LOT of time waiting. I’m talking 3-5 hours of just sitting there waiting. I get a text message from him sometime around noon or so that reads:
"I text you love dad"
He later said that it took him over an hour to type it. He was so fucking proud of himself for that message though

Posted 9 hours ago.

fuckyeahguysindresses:

the-platonic-blow:

Unrepeatable (1994)

Insta-reblog.

Posted 21 hours ago.
Vancouver Truth: Vancouver’s hierarchy of needs is inverted

kelbonation:

ihatevan:

The wonderfully bitter Xandra Grayson at Brandxproductions sent this to me on twitter to illustrate the fact our hierarchy of needs is basically completely inverted. Enjoy and see you at Saturday night yoga everyone.

image

sweetestchill LOLOL THE BOTTOM ONE DUDE..

Posted 22 hours ago.
+ cavernsoftheirteeth:

#dale cooper #rust cohle

cavernsoftheirteeth:

 

Posted 22 hours ago.

thepeoplesrecord:

Israel & Mexico swap notes on abusing rights
May 22, 2013

Earlier this month, Jorge Luis Llaven Abarca, Mexico’s newly-appointed secretary of public security in Chiapas, announced that discussions had taken place between his office and the Israeli defense ministry. The two countries talked about security coordination at the level of police, prisons and effective use of technology (“Israeli military will train Chiapas police,” Excelsior, 8 May [Spanish]).

Chiapas is home to the Zapatistas (Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional), a mostly indigenous Maya liberation movement that has enjoyed global grassroots support since it rose up against the Mexican government in 1994. The Zapatistas took back large tracts of land on which they have since built subsistence cooperatives, autonomous schools, collectivized clinics and other democratic community structures.

In the twenty years since the uprising, the Mexican government has not ceased its counterinsurgency programs in Chiapas. When Llaven Abarca was announced as security head in December, human rights organizations voiced concerns that the violence would escalate, pointing to his history of arbitrary detentions, use of public force, criminal preventive detentions, death threats and torture (“Concern about the appointment of Jorge Luis Llaven Abarca as Secretary of Public Security in Chiapas,” Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas (Frayba) Center for Human Rights,14 December 2012 [PDF, Spanish]).

Aptly, his recent contacts with Israeli personnel were “aimed at sharing experiences,” Abarca has claimed. This may be the first time the Mexican government has gone public about military coordination with Israelis in Chiapas. Yet the agreement is only the latest in Israel’s longer history of military exports to the region, an industry spawned from experiences in the conquest and pacification of Palestine.

Weapons sales escalate

The first Zionist militias (Bar Giora and HaShomer) were formed to advance the settlement of Palestinian land. Another Zionist militia, the Haganah — the precursor to the Israeli army and the successor of HaShomer — began importing and producing arms in 1920.

Israeli firms began exporting weapons in the 1950s to Latin America, including to Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic under the Somoza and Trujillo dictatorships. Massive government investment in the arms industry followed the 1967 War and the ensuing French arms embargo. Israeli arms, police, military training and equipment have now been sent to at least 140 countries, including to Guatemala in the 1980s under Efraín Ríos Montt, the former dictator recently convicted of genocide against the Maya.

Mexico began receiving Israeli weaponry in 1973 with the sale of five Arava planes fromIsrael Aerospace Industries. Throughout the 1970s and ’80s, infrequent exports continued to the country in the form of small arms, mortars and electronic fences. Sales escalated in the early 2000s, according to research that we have undertaken.

In 2003, Mexico bought helicopters formerly belonging to the Israeli army and Israel Aerospace Industries’ Gabriel missiles. Another Israeli security firm, Magal Security Systems, received one of several contracts for surveillance systems “to protect sensitive installations in Mexico” that same year, The Jerusalem Post reported.

In 2004, Israel Shipyards sold missile boats, and later both Aeronautics Defense Systems and Elbit Systems won contracts from the federal police and armed forces for drones for border and domestic surveillance (“UAV maker Aeronautics to supply Mexican police,”Globes, 15 February 2009). Verint Systems, a technology firm founded by former Israeli army personnel, has won several US-sponsored contracts since 2006 for the mass wiretapping of Mexican telecommunications, according to Jane’s Defence Weekly.

Trained by Israel

According to declassified Defense Intelligence Agency documents [PDF] obtained via a freedom of information request, Israeli personnel were discreetly sent into Chiapas in response to the 1994 Zapatista uprising for the purpose of “providing training to Mexican military and police forces.”

The Mexican government also made use of the Arava aircraft to deploy its Airborne Special Forces Group (Grupo Aeromóvil de Fuerzas Especiales, or GAFE). GAFE commandos were themselves trained by Israel and the US. Several would later desert the GAFE and go on to create “Los Zetas,” currently Mexico’s most powerful and violent drug cartel (“Los Zetas and Mexico’s Transnational Drug War,” World Politics Review, 25 December 2009).

Mexico was surprised by the Zapatistas, who rose up the day the North American Free Trade Agreement went into effect. The Mexican government found itself needing to respond to the dictates of foreign investors, as a famously-leaked Chase-Manhattan Bank memo revealed: “While Chiapas, in our opinion, does not pose a fundamental threat to Mexican political stability, it is perceived to be so by many in the investment community. The government will need to eliminate the Zapatistas to demonstrate their effective control of the national territory and of security policy.”

Full article

Posted 1 day ago.
+ clatterbane:

wordsthatfit:

Jeet Heer. [x]

A lot of people want to forget that we’re usually talking about public-private ventures that were explicitly set up for profit through exploiting “new” resources. (Originally including the indigenous populations, yes.) For example, everyone but the gentlemen investors was indentured to the Virginia Company for IIRC the first 40 years or so of the colony. Lots of convict labor too, and eventually the first British-run chattel slavery system in North America, because that made for better profits than forced labor from people they eventually had to set loose if they lived long enough. (Who were often kind of dangerous afterward, yeah.) Enter the invention of the color line, etc.
Arresting people for doing basically nothing so you can exploit them for cheap/free labor is hardly a new idea, either. Even neater if you can racialize that too. :/
No wonder the national mythology wants to focus on a bunch of separatist religious nuts seeking “freedom”—after the first shipload of captive West Africans had already been forced into labor in Virginia.
But, it isn’t just that modern capitalism developed out of all kinds of genocide and forced labor. Profit motives drove these crimes against humanity to begin with.

clatterbane:

wordsthatfit:

Jeet Heer. [x]

A lot of people want to forget that we’re usually talking about public-private ventures that were explicitly set up for profit through exploiting “new” resources. (Originally including the indigenous populations, yes.) For example, everyone but the gentlemen investors was indentured to the Virginia Company for IIRC the first 40 years or so of the colony. Lots of convict labor too, and eventually the first British-run chattel slavery system in North America, because that made for better profits than forced labor from people they eventually had to set loose if they lived long enough. (Who were often kind of dangerous afterward, yeah.) Enter the invention of the color line, etc.

Arresting people for doing basically nothing so you can exploit them for cheap/free labor is hardly a new idea, either. Even neater if you can racialize that too. :/

No wonder the national mythology wants to focus on a bunch of separatist religious nuts seeking “freedom”—after the first shipload of captive West Africans had already been forced into labor in Virginia.

But, it isn’t just that modern capitalism developed out of all kinds of genocide and forced labor. Profit motives drove these crimes against humanity to begin with.

Posted 1 day ago.

richardalperts:

:

#it killed me and then i looked at the socks and it killed me again

Posted 1 day ago. Tagged with Show all posts tagged with "bsg".bsg, .

There’s some terms that these young trans people don’t want to hear.

Posted 1 day ago.

allstreets:

Avenue de l’Hôtel-de-Ville - Montreal, Canada